Tag Archives: Karl Krayer

Heath Brothers to Distribute New Business Book

Chip and Dan Heath are publishing their first book in 4 1/2 years.  We haveHeathBrothers featured their previous books at the First Friday Book Synopsis in Dallas, which are Made to Stick (Random House, 2007), Switch (Crown, 2010), and Decisive (Crown, 2013).   I use Made to Stick as a required book in my MBA Business Communication course at the University of Dallas.  Randy Mayeux has delivered a workshop around the principles of Decisive, that we have facilitated for several companies.

PowerofMomentsBookCoverThis book is called The Power of Moments:  Why Certain Moments Have Extraordinary Impact (Simon & Schuster), and will be released on October 3, 2017.

Here is a description of their new book, from an e-Mail that I received from them today:

In this book, the Heath Brothers explore why certain brief experiences can jolt us and elevate us and change us—and how we can learn to create such extraordinary moments in our life and work.

While human lives are endlessly variable, our most memorable positive moments are dominated by four elements: elevation, insight, pride, and connection. If we embrace these elements, we can conjure more moments that matter. What if a teacher could design a lesson that he knew his students would remember 20 years later? What if a manager knew how to create an experience that would delight customers? What if you had a better sense of how to create memories that matter for your children?

This book delves into some fascinating mysteries of experience: Why we tend to remember the best or worst moment of an experience, as well as the last moment, and forget the rest. Why “we feel most comfortable when things are certain, but we feel most alive when they’re not.” And why our most cherished memories are clustered into a brief period during our youth.

Readers discover how brief experiences can change lives, such as the experiment in which two strangers meet in a room, and forty-five minutes later, they leave as best friends. (What happens in that time?) Or the tale of the world’s youngest female billionaire, who credits her resilience to something her father asked the family at the dinner table. (What was that simple question?)

Many of the defining moments in our lives are the result of accident or luck—but why would we leave our most meaningful, memorable moments to chance when we can create them? The Power of Moments shows us how to be the author of richer experiences.

New Rules of Work about Cover Letters and Resumes

On Friday at the Park City Club in Dallas, I will present a synopsis of this best-seller by Alexandra Cavoulacos and Kathryn MinshewThe new rules of work:  The modern playbook for navigating your career.  New York:  Crown Books (2017).

You can register for this event on the home page of 15MinuteBusinessBooks.com.

One of the issues the authors discuss is whether job seekers still need resumes and cover letters, given the amount of information available about them on social media sites, such as LinkedIn, Facebook, or Twitter.

Here is what they say:

Believe us, we’ve heard that question many times before.  But heed our advice when we say that nothing replaces your formal resume and cover letter.  Not your LinkedIn profile.  Not your impressive personal website.  Not your articulate expression of your skills and talents in your informational interview, or your well-written email to the hiring managers.  These are all important, of course.  However, you absolutely still need to have a polished resume and cover letter prepared.  Because all those extra trappings won’t matter if you don’t have the right packaging to catch the eye of your target audience – the hiring managers” (p. 125).

They publish a list of resume and cover letter do’s and don’ts (pp. 149-150)

 

Resume

Cover Letter

Do’s

 

·      Tailor your information

·      Include quantifiable achievements

·      Show, don’t tell

·      Make contact information easy to find

·      Stick to one page – two at most

·      Check for skimmability

·      Include key words from job description

·      Use powerful and unique verbs

·      Proofread

·      Save as a PDF

Do’s

 

·   Share your personality

·   Tell a relevant story about what brought you to the job

·   Expand on your resume

·   Highlight key transferable skills

·   Use the company’s “voice”

·   Address the letter to someone specific

Don’ts

 

·      Make bullets read like job descriptions

·      Include confidential information about a previous employer

·      List “references available upon request”

·      Neglect application instructions

·      Squish it all to one page – six point font

·      Lie

Don’ts

 

·  Fail to write one

·  Regurgitate your resume

·  Use stiff, formal language

·  Address to “whom it may concern”

·  Include a desired salary – unless asked

 

One More Presentation This Week on GRIT

On Thursday, May 11, I will present yet another application of the best-seller, Grit, GritCoverwritten by Angela Duckworth
 
ShrineLogoThe presentation is to the Dallas High Noon Club during its weekly luncheon.  I am a member of the club, to which visitors are welcome.  Most attendees are active members, or their relatives, of Hella Shrine.
 
The program is entitled:

Grit:  Passion and Perseverance in Your Masonic Life.”
 
We will be at the Hilton Doubletree Hotel, directly across from Love Field Airport.  The lunch begins at 11:45 p.m.  The cost is $15 per person.
 
If you wish to attend, please RSVP by Thursday morning to Steve Eason at
.
 

 

Learning Leadership Means Debunking Popular Myths

On Friday at the First Friday Book Synopsis at the Dallas Park City Club, I will present this best-seller:

Kouzes, J.M. & Posner, B.ZLearning leadership:  The five fundamentals of becoming anLearningLeadershipCover exemplary leader.  San Francisco:  Wiley.

If you have not yet registered, simply click here and save money from the on-site price.

The book’s authors are James Kouzes and Barry Posner.  Kouzes is pictured on the left, and Posner is on the right.  Their other famous books are The Leadership Challenge and Encouraging the Heart.

KouzesPicture                                   PosnerPicture

Early in the book, the authors address whether leaders are born or made.  Here is what they say:

Asking, ‘Are leaders born or made?’ is not a very productive question.  It’s the old nature versus nurture argument, and it doesn’t get at a more important question that must be asked and answered.  The more useful question is ‘Can you, and those you work with, become better leaders than you are today?’  The answer to that question is a resounding yes” (p. 4).

Just a few pages later, the authors talk about some myths associated with leadership:

Four Myths (pp. 5-11)

Talent myth – Leadership is not a talent, “but an observable, learnable set of skills and abilities. Leadership is distributed in the population like any other set of skills” (p. 5).

Position myth – Leadership is not a rank, title, or place

Strengths myth – You cannot do your best without searching for challenges, doing things you’ve never done, making mistakes, and learning from them

Self-reliance myth – the best leaders know they can’t do it alone

If you miss the synopsis live this Friday, you can access it later at 15MinuteBusinessBooks.com.

 

Our Upcoming Book Answers Essential Business Questions

Randy Mayeux and I are really excited about our upcoming book, entitled Answers to 100 Best Business Questions from 100 Best-Selling Business Books.

The book attempts to answer questions that our clients have in areas such as customer service, management, leadership, teamwork, communication skills, and strategy.   The answers come from books that we have presented over the years at the First Friday Book Synopsis in Dallas.  Each question and answer fits on exactly one page.

The idea for the book came from a presentation we heard last week at Success North Dallas with Jill Schiefelbein, who spoke on business video, podcasting, and livestreaming. She is called the DYNAMIC COMMUNICATOR.  Her major take-away is that businesses need to answer the questions that their customers ask.  I am pictured with her below.

Here is a sample page from the book to whet your appetite:

What do customers really want salespeople to know?

Ram Charan.  (2007).  What the customer wants you to know:  How everybody needs to think differently about sales.  New York:  Portfolio.

The landscape for selling has changed in significant ways in the past twenty years.  Customers’ quest for personal service and high quality, now rival the best possible price that they want to pay.  In this best-seller, Ram Charan explains what this revolution in customer demands means for salespeople’s behavior.

 

What exactly has changed?  Years ago, supplies were tight, and customers had to book orders months in advance, with little room to negotiate price.  Salespeople transitioned from order-takers to ambassadors, identifying needs and linking them to products and services, building relationships with their customers.  Today, there is a glut of suppliers and supplies, with access from the Internet to all types of locations.  The customers are under pressure to deliver value to their clients. “But the pressure on customers to perform is actually a huge opportunity for those suppliers who can help them….So while they want low prices, they also want their clients to love their products and services.  They want to win against their competitors and stay ahead of them…They want suppliers who can help them accomplish those things by acting as partners, not one-time transactors” (pp. 4-5)

 

So, what does Charan say to do? Make the focus on the prosperity of your customers.  Become your customer’s trusted partner, requiring you to understand: (1) the customer’s set of opportunities and the anatomy of competitive dynamics, (2) the customer’s customers and the customer’s competitors, (3) how decisions are made in the customer’s organization, (4) the customer’s company culture and its dominant psychology and values, and (5) the customer’s goals and priorities, both short-term and long-term, clearly and specifically (p. 40).

 

In short, Charan tells you to measure your success by how well your customers are doing with your help.  Do not focus on selling a product or service; focus on how you can help the customer succeed in all ways that are important to that customer.

JillSPictureSND

CCN Partnering Program Builds Teams for You

We are really excited about building teams in your organization, for any unit, division, department, or task force.

Remember that it is better when you work together!

You can click on the flier below to download it.

Contact us at (972) 601-1537 for complete information about how this will work for you!

 

CCNPartneringFlier

Click on image for full view

 

 

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