Tag Archives: Wharton

Meet David Robertson – Author of Brick by Brick – September FFBS Selection

Who is David C. Robertson, the author of BRICK BY BRICK:  HOW LEGO REWROTE THE RULES OF INNOVATION AND CONQUERED THE GLOBAL TOY INDUSTRY?

That’s the book I present on Friday, September 6 at the First Friday Book Synopsis in Dallas.  You can register here.

 

 

 

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I found this biography on his website.  I thought you might find it interesting.

David Robertson is a Professor of Practice at the Wharton School where he teaches Innovation and Product Development in Wharton’s undergraduate, MBA, and executive education programs. From 2002 through 2010, Robertson was the LEGO Professor of Innovation and Technology Management at Switzerland’s Institute for Management Development (IMD), which received the #1 worldwide ranking by the Financial Times for its executive education programs. At IMD he was Program Director for IMD’s largest program, the Program for Executive Development, and co-Director of the Making Business Sense of IT program, a joint program between IMD and MIT Sloan.

“Robertson is the author of Brick by Brick: How LEGO Reinvented its Innovation System and Conquered the Toy Industry, and co-author of Enterprise Architecture as Strategy. He has published in Harvard Business Review, Sloan Management Review, and many other journals. Robertson has consulted and led educational programs for a wide range of companies, including EMC, Credit Suisse, HSBC, Georg Fischer, Braskem, Banco Santander, Skanska, Swisscom, Russell Investments, Novozymes, GMAC, Grundfos, BT, Microsoft, Heineken, Philip Morris, Globe Telecom, Tieto Enator, and AXA.

“Prior to IMD, Robertson was a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, a consultant at McKinsey & Company for 5 years, and an executive at four enterprise software companies. David received his MBA and PhD from MIT and BS from the University of Illinois.  David, his wife, and two children live in Chestnut Hill, a suburb of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.”

Taken from: http://www.robertsoninnovation.com

Legos: A Key to Your Childhood, but also a Great Company!

BrickbyBrickCoverDavid C. RobertsonThe new book released about Legos brings back childhood memories for many of us.  What did you make with Legos?  Towers?  Trucks?  Railroads?  How tall did they get?  What happened if someone knocked them over?

This book is about the company.  Its’ title is Brick by Brick:  How Lego Rewrote the Rules of Innovation and Conquered the Global Toy Industry.

The author, David C. Robertson, is someone whom you may not know much about.  How about these credentials?  He is a Professor of Practice at the Wharton School where he teaches Innovation and Product Development in Wharton’s undergraduate, MBA, and executive education programs. From 2002 through 2010, Robertson was the LEGO Professor of Innovation and Technology Management at Switzerland’s Institute for Management Development (IMD), which received the #1 worldwide ranking by the Financial Times for its executive education programs. At IMD he was Program Director for IMD’s largest program, the Program for Executive Development, and co-Director of the Making Business Sense of IT program, a joint program between IMD and MIT Sloan.  Prior to IMD, Robertson was a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, a consultant at McKinsey & Company for five years, and an executive at four enterprise software companies. David received his MBA and PhD from MIT and BS from the University of Illinois.

You can read the review of the book in the Wall Street Journal by clicking here.  I am waiting to see if this book hits the best-seller list in the New York Times.  If it does, I will select it for presentation at a future First Friday Book Synopsis in Dallas.  Continue to monitor our e-Mails for information.

And, if you live in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, you can be a kid again!  Go to Legoland at the Grapevine Mills mall.  Click here for complete information.

Sure, this book is about a company, its leadership, its successes, and so forth. But, there is no way you will read it without also remembering how you held Legos between your thumb and finger, trying to press it into another Lego already on your table.

Remember that? Let’s talk about it really soon.

To Turn That Great Idea Into Business Success, You Probably Need Some Good Old-Fashioned Management

We are surrounded by swirling stories of breakthrough ideas, creative moments of genius of one kind or another.  And I think it is true that without that right, great idea, there is little chance for that next new, new thing.

But how do you turn that idea into an actual, working, effective, profitable business?  That takes old-fashioned management work.

That was the underlying truth behind this Morning Report segment, U. Penn Wharton School excels in Silicon Valley.  Note this excerpt:

Michael Sinkula: I have a company here in Silicon Valley. Since I started the company, I wasn’t willing to leave and go to MBA school.
There are lots of Sinkulas out here — with years of experience working in startups, but little idea how to take businesses to the next level, especially going public.
“Wharton operates as a business, not just a business school…  If you have an opportunity to tap into a demand for MBAs, you look to the region hat has that greatest demand, and at the moment, that region is Silicone Valley.”  (Tim Bajarin, a high-tech analyst in Silicon Valley).
The valley is full of sad stories about start-ups that failed because they didn’t have the right management, so this time around venture capitalists are looking for companies whose execs have MBAs.
(from The Marketplace Morning Report, March 26, 2012)

In an earlier blog post, I raised this question:  Which is It? Overmanaged and Underled — OR, Undermanaged and Overled? How about Undermanaged and Underled?  The answer is increasingly obvious.  A company needs it all:  good ideas, breakthrough concepts, good leadership, and some good, up-to-date, old-fashioned management.

There is almost no end to the multi-faceted-expertise needed on the road to success.