Tag Archives: Slate

A Tidy-Up Book Cleans Up on the Best-Seller List

This is a book that you probably don’t want to see.  Yet, plenty have, as it has become a New York Times best-seller since its initial distribution in October, 2014.  Even today, it remains at #39 on TidyingUp Coverthe Amazon.com best-seller list.

Marie Kondo wrote The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up:  The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing (Ten Speed Press).  This is actually her third book on organizing.

Marie Kondo picture

 

Who is Marie Kondo?  The London Times described her as “Japan’s preeminent guru of tidiness, a warrior princess in the war on clutter.”  Her actual business is as a consultant in Tokyo, assisting clients to change the look and feel of their homes and offices.

How many books on clutter have you seen become a television drama?  It happened for this one on Japanese television.   Articles have appeared about her in the Wall Street Journal,  Red, You, New York Times, USA Today, NPR’s Here & Now, Slate, and Family Circle.  Her method of organizing is known as the KonMari method, and consists of gathering together everything you own and then keeping only those things which “spark joy”, and choosing a place for everything from then on.

 

 

 

These are the key five tips from her book that appear in today’s Wall Street Journal.  You can read the entire article by clicking here.  These tips are called “How to Kondo.”

  • Tidy by category: Clothes first, then books, papers, miscellany and sentimental items.
  • Don’t foist your unwanted stuff on family members who might take it out of guilt. Give it to charity.
  • There is nothing more annoying than papers.’ Throw them all away, unless they are absolutely necessary.
  • Forget fancy storage containers. Drawers and shoeboxes often suffice.
  • Avoid piles. Tip items up on their sides and store them next to each other, rather than stacking them. (p. D2)

You can rest assured we won’t present this one at the First Friday Book Synopsis in Dallas.   The guilt might be overwhelming.  I read this response from Mrs. Paul Iverson online:  “It’s sad to think that we need a book to tell us it’s okay to be neat, clean and tidy.  To discard stuff that we don’t need, never should have bought in the first place,  or is broken!  I guess this is good for anyone that didn’t learn it at a young age!

 

Nothing Beats a Good Controversy — Chris Anderson, The Long Tail, and the Allure of “Free”

The Long Tail is a great concept in our ever expanding, internet connected world.  In this book (originally an article), Chris Anderson explained clearly that the market is now almost unending.  Exhibit A was Amazon.  The vast majority of what they sell (in books) is available at Border’s or Barnes&Noble.  But, much can be made from the 20% or so that is not stocked in such physical bookstores.  This “Long Tail” is the market available from the rest of the world who find you in other ways, especially the internet.  (You can purchase my synopsis, audio + handout, of The Long Tail here).

His long awaited new book comes out in July: Free: The Future of a Radical Price.  Here’s the summary from Amazon:  “in Free, he makes the compelling case that in many instances businesses can profit more from giving things away than they can by charging for them. Far more than a promotional gimmick, Free is a business strategy that may well be essential to a company’s survival.”  You can read the Wired article, Free! Why $0.00 Is the Future of Business that launched his concept here.

The idea is simple enough.  Give something away free, give a lot away free, and they will come back for more, and they will willingly pay for the more.

It makes sense.  And I know that what we give away can spark interest, generate followership, and maybe produce a long-term relationship with a customer.  But even before the book hits, the criticism has started.  And the first question is blunt and to the point:  if free is such a good idea, and if Chris Anderson is the editor of Wired, why doesn’t he give Wired away free?  James Ledbetter provides this criticism in his Slate/The Big Money article:  Free to Be Ignored.

Ledbetter is doubtful that the business model works.  And he’s got a lot of reason to be so doubtful.  We are reading nearly daily that the newspaper as we know it is in great jeopardy.  The rumblings have begin that the Kindle, and unknown future such devices, might put “printed books” out of business.  And if we think that alarm is too early, let’s remember that we have only had the internet 15 years — and it took just over a dozen years for people to realize that the free content of news was ultimately a threat to the news gathering business.  (To put it simply, if news is free, who will pay the reporters to gather the stories and dig into the corners and crevices of our society — in other words, to practice journalism?)  On-line music sites have greatly crushed the profits from what used to be called record sales.  All of this proves that free works in one way — people like to get stuff free.  But free may not bring in enough money on the back end.

(And, by the way, Wired does give much of its content away.  I read Free for free on-line).

I write this with few answers— just questions.  I really don’t know what will happen.  I’m a firm believer in “free.”  I have spoken for free, I have sent handouts to people for free, as have many who do what I do.  But I can’t give it all away for free.

So where is free going?  We all watch and wait.

(By the way, I’m certain that either Karl or I will present a synopsis of Free pretty soon after its publication – and yes, we will pay actual money for a hard copy of the book Free.  Probably from Amazon.com).