Tag Archives: First Friday Book Synopsiis

Looking Forward to December

This is going to be a leap of faith.

Randy Mayeux and I co-founded the First Friday Book Synopsis, and I gave monthly presentations on best-selling business books for 22 years. Randy is still keeping the program going, and I am committed to present on December 4, 2020. It will be the first time for me to speak to high-powered business audiences since the stroke hit three years ago. I have three months to prepare, and I have great members at BIND (Brain Injury Network of Dallas) and therapists, who work and support me, and who believe in me. It is time to do this again. The book is “Your Next Five Moves: Master the Art of Business Strategy” by Patrick Bet-David, published by Gallery Books (2020).   I am pictured with Bette Price, who is an original participant in the program, and who I presented with a lifetime membership.
Image may contain: 3 people, including Bette Price and Karl Krayer, people standing, suit and indoor

Give Certificates to the First Friday Book Synopsis this Holiday Season

GIVE YOUR COLLEAGUES AND PROFESSIONAL FRIENDS A MEANINGFUL GIFT THIS SEASON….
 
Instead of giving a tie that he will never wear, a dry fruitcake that she doesn’t want to eat, or a bottle of champagne that no one wants to drink….
 
We are now taking orders for Gift Certificates for the First Friday Book Synopsis, good throughout 2017. 
 
These are personally inscribed, with TO: (his or her name) and  FROM: (your name).
 
Each certificate is just $32.  They are on attractive holiday paper, placed in a 10×12 envelope for you to give or mail to your recipient.  If you give us the address, we will mail it for you for an extra $2.
 
All you need to do is let us know who this goes to, and where, and we will get it to you.
 
If you are attending the December 2 program this Friday, you can place your order at that time.
 
If not, all we need is your credit or debit card number along with the expiration date.  You can send this information to:  ,  or dictate it (slowly) into Karl Krayer’s voice-mail at (972) 601-1537.
 
Don’t miss out!  This will be a meaningful gift that your colleague or professional friend will genuinely appreciate!
 

A Tidy-Up Book Cleans Up on the Best-Seller List

This is a book that you probably don’t want to see.  Yet, plenty have, as it has become a New York Times best-seller since its initial distribution in October, 2014.  Even today, it remains at #39 on TidyingUp Coverthe Amazon.com best-seller list.

Marie Kondo wrote The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up:  The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing (Ten Speed Press).  This is actually her third book on organizing.

Marie Kondo picture

 

Who is Marie Kondo?  The London Times described her as “Japan’s preeminent guru of tidiness, a warrior princess in the war on clutter.”  Her actual business is as a consultant in Tokyo, assisting clients to change the look and feel of their homes and offices.

How many books on clutter have you seen become a television drama?  It happened for this one on Japanese television.   Articles have appeared about her in the Wall Street Journal,  Red, You, New York Times, USA Today, NPR’s Here & Now, Slate, and Family Circle.  Her method of organizing is known as the KonMari method, and consists of gathering together everything you own and then keeping only those things which “spark joy”, and choosing a place for everything from then on.

 

 

 

These are the key five tips from her book that appear in today’s Wall Street Journal.  You can read the entire article by clicking here.  These tips are called “How to Kondo.”

  • Tidy by category: Clothes first, then books, papers, miscellany and sentimental items.
  • Don’t foist your unwanted stuff on family members who might take it out of guilt. Give it to charity.
  • There is nothing more annoying than papers.’ Throw them all away, unless they are absolutely necessary.
  • Forget fancy storage containers. Drawers and shoeboxes often suffice.
  • Avoid piles. Tip items up on their sides and store them next to each other, rather than stacking them. (p. D2)

You can rest assured we won’t present this one at the First Friday Book Synopsis in Dallas.   The guilt might be overwhelming.  I read this response from Mrs. Paul Iverson online:  “It’s sad to think that we need a book to tell us it’s okay to be neat, clean and tidy.  To discard stuff that we don’t need, never should have bought in the first place,  or is broken!  I guess this is good for anyone that didn’t learn it at a young age!