Tag Archives: business best-sellers

Three Business Books Debut on Best-Seller List This Week

This was an incredible week for new entries on the Business Best-Seller lists.  Today, the Wall Street Journal published its list of hardcover business books, and an astonishing three new books debuted (March 11-12, 2017, p. C-10).

The first is Unshakeable:  Your Financial Freedom Playbook by Tony Robbins (New York:  Simon & Schuster, 2017).   It debuted all the way to the top – in its first week on the best-seller list, it sits at # 1.

The second is Age-Proof:  Living Longer without Running Out of Money or Breaking a Hip by Jean Chatzky and Michael F. Rozien (New York:  Grand Central Life & Style, 2017).  It came in at # 3.

The last is The Complacent Class:  The Self-Defeating Quest for the American Dream by Tyler Cowen (New York:  St. Martin’s Press, 2017).  This book debuted at # 6.

Over the next few days, I will discuss with Randy Mayeux the possibility of these books appearing at our First Friday Book Synopsis in the upcoming months.  Look for additional information and decisions very soon.

Three New Debut Best-Sellers

There are three  hardcover business books that debuted on today’s Wall Street Journal best-selling list (May 28-29, p. C 16).

They are:

# 4 – NEVER SPLIT THE DIFFERENCE by Christopher Voss (Harper Business)

# 5 – YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE A SHARK by Robert Herjavec (St. Martin’s Press)

#10 – MAKERS AND TAKERS by Rana Foroohar (Crown Business)

We will watch to see which of these, if any, make the New York Times business best-seller list.  That is our primary source for selecting books for the First Friday Book Synopsis in Dallas.  Click here for information about our monthly event.

Of interest, our August selection at the FFBS, The Ideal Team Player by Patrick Lencioni (Jossey-Bass) climbed from # 7 to # 3 this week.  The Chris Anderson book, TED:  A Guide to Public Speaking (Houghton-Mifflin) dropped from # 3 to # 9 this week.

For those who are looking for the New York Times Business Best Seller List – There hasn’t been one lately

For a few years, I have listed the titles and linked to the New York Times list of Business Hardcover Best Sellers.  I prefer this list.  Amazon updates its list hourly; other sources (e.g., the Wall Street Journal) publish a weekly list.  But I know enough to know that an hourly, or even a weekly list, can be very misleading.  One radio or tv interview can spike the hourly list.  A speaker who buys a few thousand copies of his own book to distribute can spike the weekly list (and, even, a monthly list).  But I have always sensed that the once-a-month New York Times list was most representative of books that have some level of “staying power.”

Our blogging colleague, Bob Morris, reminds us that Best Sellers are not necessarily good and valuable books.  He is right about that.  And, conversely, some really good and valuable books never make the Best Sellers list.  For example, if you make me choose the first book I would recommend as we constantly wrestle with innovation, it would probably be Get There Early: Sensing the Future to Compete in the Present by Bob Johansen.  It is a really good book, and is the book that introduced me to the “VUCA” world we live in.    I don’t think it ever hit the New York Times list.  At this hour, it is # #350,322 on the hourly updated list for Amazon, far from being a best seller.

{But, Amazon, finds a way to create many “additional “ best seller lists.  At this hour, Get There Early in its Kindle version, after factoring in 4 categories and sub-categories is #42:

Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #189,952 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
#42 in Kindle Store > Kindle eBooks > Nonfiction > Business & Investing > Management & Leadership > Planning & Forecasting}

On this thought, I recently read a terrific essay on this year’s Pulitzer controversy:  A Passion for Immortality: On the Missing Pulitzer and the Problem with Prizes by Benjamin Hale.  Here’s an insightful excerpt:

As the Pulitzer is awarded to a work of fiction published in the previous year, all it can take stock of is a book’s vertical life, which sometimes can be deceiving. I’m sure this helps explain some of the more embarrassing retrospective head-slaps in the Pulitzer’s history, such as when, in 1930, it awarded the prize to Oliver La Farge’s Laughing Boy — a second-rate and now utterly forgotten book by an utterly forgotten writer — for the year in which both Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises and Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury were published. It’s perfectly natural they would make that mistake; back then, Faulkner and Hemingway were not yet Faulkner and Hemingway, they were just a couple of young writers who happened to be named Faulkner and Hemingway. The Pulitzer Board would try to atone for their sin years later by awarding them both (Faulkner twice) prizes for far lesser works after their reputations were already secure. The hype of the moment does not necessarily translate into lasting luminance. Just scroll down the list of all the past winners of the prize, and count how many you’ve ever heard of. Start at the bottom and move upward chronologically, and you’ll find the occurrence of familiar names increases as we move closer to the present. This is not because the Pulitzer Board has gradually been growing wiser — it’s because we’re living now, not a hundred years in the future. Then we’ll see. We can’t help it — we’re blinded by our own times; all prizes are like that, and that is why, as a measure of what is good and what is not in art, they are not exactly the trustworthiest oracles.

But, back to the issue before me now. I think we need some place to go to ask something like this:  “What books in business are generating the most conversation right now?”  I prefer the New York Times monthly list for this purpose.  There have been a few months here and there when they apparently just “skipped” the business list entirely.  And right now, they have not had a Business Hardcover Best Seller list since March, 2012.  I don’t know why.

I have tweeted New York Times writers, I have called a finance writer at the New York Times, and he gave me the phone number for the books section to call.  But I have been unable, after a few phone calls, to reach a human being in the books section to ask the question.  The phone number that gets me to that section has no “voice mail” capability, so I cannot even leave a message.

Does anyone know what happened to the list?  I would love to know.  Does anyone have a better number for me to call?  I would love to try.  Help me if you can.  Just leave a comment below in the comments section.

In the meantime, I cannot post a current list.  Sorry about that.

Here’s the link to the last New York Times list I posted in March:  Here’s the New York Times Hardcover Business Best Sellers List for March, 2012.  Here’s the link to the current hourly Amazon “Best Sellers in Business and Investing.”  (As I write, Steve Jobs is back up at #1).  Does anyone know of a better list to suggest?  I’m open to your help.  Just let me know in the comments section below.

Here is the New York Times Hardcover Business Bestsellers list for September, 2011.

Here is the New York Times Hardcover Business Bestsellers list for September, 2011.

A couple of observations:  we clearly still want to know just what caused the financial meltdown, and we keep looking for explanations.  And, personal and finance books seem to be in need.  There are a lot of “still on the list” books:  Ferris, the Heath Brothers, Hsieh, Schultz.

At the First Friday Book Synopsis, my colleague Karl Krayer and I have presented synopses of, either at our event or for a “private client,” #’s  2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 10, 12, and 14.  I’m not quite sure that any of the new titles quite fit for the First Friday Book Synopsis.

Here’s the list (read the full list, with brief info about each book, at the New York Times here):

1

NOTHING TO LOSE, EVERYTHING TO GAIN, by Ryan Blair.

2

AFTERSHOCK, by David Wiedemer, Robert A. Wiedemer and Cindy Spitzer.

3

4-HOUR WORKWEEK, by Timothy Ferriss.

4

TOTAL MONEY MAKEOVER, by Dave Ramsey.

5

SWITCH, by Chip Heath and Dan Heath.

6

RECKLESS ENDANGERMENT, by Gretchen Morgenson and Joshua Rosner.

7

MONEY CLASS, by Suze Orman.

8

DELIVERING HAPPINESS, by Tony Hsieh.

9

STRENGTHS-BASED LEADERSHIP, by Tom Rath and Barry Conchie.

10

ENCHANTMENT, by Guy Kawasaki.

11

CAR GUYS VS. BEAN COUNTERS, by Bob Lutz.

12

END GAME, by John Mauldin and Jonathan Tepper.

13

CHANGE ANYTHING, by Kerry Patterson and Others.

14

ONWARD, by Howard Schultz with Joanne Gordon.

15

GET RICH CLICK!, by Marc Ostrofsky. online. (†)

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You can purchase many of our synopses, with audio + handout, at our companion web site, 15minutebusinessbooks.com.

And, if you are in the DFW area, come join us for the First Friday Book Synopsis, at the Park City Club in University Park, 7:00 am, the First Fiday of every month.  You can register from the home page of this blog’s web site.  Just follow the register now button (note;  it usually takes a few days into the month before the next month’s registration is available.)

Here’s the April, 2011 list of Hardcover Business Best Sellers from the New York Times

Here is the April list of Hardcover Business Best Sellers from the New York Times.  As I have written often, this is the list that I most watch – it is a monthly list, which I think better captures what is selling (the Amazon list is updated hourly, and any one hour may be misleading; and some other publications publish weekly lists, which again (in my opinion) do not indicate the “staying power” of the business best sellers).

At the First Friday Book Synopsis, we have presented synopses of #s 6, 8, 11, 14, 15.  We are presenting # 2, Tell to Win, and # 7, Enchantment at the May First Friday Book Synopsis.  I think I will probably present #3, Win, fairly soon.  There are a couple of others on the list we will consider…

And the other books are primarily finance books, which we typically do not present at our event.

Here’s the April list from the New York Times.

1 THE MONEY CLASS, by Suze Orman. (Spiegel & Grau, $26.) The noted personal financial adviser offers a reconsideration of the American dream. (†)
2 TELL TO WIN, by Peter Guber. (Crown Business, $26.) The role of storytelling in business success. (†)
3 WIN, by Frank I. Luntz. (Hyperion, $25.99.) Using communication skills to improve a business. (†)
4 THE THANK YOU ECONOMY, by Gary Vaynerchuk. (Harper Business/HarperCollins, $24.99.) Tips on using social media tools to connect to customers. (†)
5 THE ENTREPRENEUR EQUATION, by Carol Roth. (BenBella, $24.95,) Evaluate your qualifications to establish if you should endeavor to become an entrepreneur. (†)
6 OUTLIERS, by Malcolm Gladwell. (Little, Brown, $27.99.) Why some people succeed — it has to do with luck and opportunities as well as talent — from the author of “Blink” and “The Tipping Point.”
7* ENCHANTMENT, by Guy Kawasaki. (Portfolio/Penguin, $26.95.) A former Apple employee explains how to gain professionally and personally by bringing about change in others. (†)
8 THE 4-HOUR WORKWEEK, by Timothy Ferriss. (Crown, $22.) Reconstructing your life so that it’s not all about work. (†)
9 THE TOTAL MONEY MAKEOVER, by Dave Ramsey (Thomas Nelson, $24.99.) Debt reduction and fiscal fitness for families, by the radio talk-show host. (†)
10* SURVIVING YOUR SERENGETI, by Stefan Swanepoel. (Wiley, $21.95.) African animals provide inspiration for mastering business and life. (†)
11 SWITCH, by Chip Heath and Dan Heath. (Broadway Business, $26.) How everyday people can effect transformative change at work and in life. (†)
12 ENDGAME, by John Mauldin and Jonathan Tepper. (Wiley, $27.95.) How the “debt supercycle” is adversely affecting developing countries around the world, including the United States.
13* THE INVESTMENT ANSWER, by Daniel C. Goldie and Gordon S. Murray. (Business Plus, $18.) Five questions every investor should ask. (†)
14 STRENGTHS BASED LEADERSHIP, by Tom Rath and Barry Conchie. (Gallup, $24.95.) Three keys to being a more effective leader. (†)
15 DELIVERING HAPPINESS, by Tony Hsieh. (Grand Central, $23.99.) Lessons from business (pizza place, worm farm, Zappos) and life. (†)

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You can purchase many of our synopses, with audio + handout, at our companion web site, 15minutebusinessbooks.com.    (Be sure to read the faqs).We have presented these to live audiences every month for over 13 years, and people find them quite useful and valuable.

The 1st New York Times Hardcover Business Best-Sellers List of the Year – January, 2011

Here is the latest (January 2, 2011) Hardcover Business Best Sellers list from the New York Times.  If you take out some of the finance-related and investment-related books, we have presented most of these at the First Friday Book Synopsis.  (I am presenting the number one book on the list, All the Devils are Here, at the February gathering).   I have presented The Big Short to an outside gathering, and my synopsis of that book is available on our companion web site, 15minutebusinessbooks.com.

(We have presented Delivering Happiness, The Big Short, Outliers, Switch, The 4-Hour Work Week, Drive, Rework, and Superfreakonomics from this list.  Most of these are now available on our companion web site, with audio + handout, at 15minutebusinessbooks.com).

 

1 ALL THE DEVILS ARE HERE, by Bethany McLean and Joe Nocera. (Portfolio/ Penguin, $32.95.) Two business journalists ex­amine the financial crisis of 2008.
2* THE BIG SHORT, by Michael Lewis. (Norton, $27.95.) The people who saw the real estate crash coming and made billions from their foresight.
3 DELIVERING HAPPINESS, by Tony Hsieh. (Grand Central, $23.99.) Lessons from business (pizza place, worm farm, Zappos) and life. (†)
4 OUTLIERS, by Malcolm Gladwell. (Little, Brown, $27.99.) Why some people succeed — it has to do with luck and opportunities as well as talent — from the author of “Blink” and “The Tipping Point.”
5 SWITCH, by Chip Heath and Dan Heath. (Broadway Business, $26.) How everyday people can effect transformative change at work and in life. (†)
6* THE TOTAL MONEY MAKEOVER, by Dave Ramsey (Thomas Nelson, $24.99.) Debt reduction and fiscal fitness for families, by the radio talk-show host. (†)
7 GRIFTOPIA, by Matt Taibbi. (Spiegel & Grau, $26.) The rise of the grifters and the stranglehold they have on America, financially.
8 THE 4-HOUR WORKWEEK, by Timothy Ferriss. (Crown, $22.) Reconstructing your life so that it’s not all about work. (†)
9 SUPERFREAKONOMICS, by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner. (Morrow/HarperCollins, $29.99.) A scholar and a journalist apply economic thinking to everything: the sequel.
10 DRIVE, by Daniel H. Pink. (Riverhead, $26.95.) What really motivates people is the quest for autonomy, mastery and purpose, not external rewards.
11 DEBUNKERY, by Ken Fisher with Lara Hoffmans (Wiley, $27.95.) Avoid bad investment practices by learning to debunk 50 myths common to the market. (†)
12 THE MENTOR LEADER, by Tony Dungy. (Tyndale House, $24.99.) The former head coach of the Indianapolis Colts football team offers tips for helping to inspire growth. (†)
13 STRENGTHS BASED LEADERSHIP, by Tom Rath and Barry Conchie. (Gallup, $24.95.) Three keys to being a more effective leader. (†)
14 AFTERSHOCK, by Robert B. Reich. (Knopf, $25.) Looking at the future of the United States economy, the Clinton-era labor secretary fears that inevitable national belt-tightening could trigger a political convulsion.
15 REWORK, by Jason Fried and David Heinemeier Hansson. (Crown Business, $22.) Counterintuitive rules for small-business success, like “Ignore the details early on” and “Good enough is fine.” (†)