Category Archives: Karl’s blog entries

Entries by Karl J Krayer, PhD

Welch Left a Great Legacy in Management and Leadership

Among the most popular titles we presented at the First Friday Book Synopsis were those from Jack Welch.  These were three best in his collection, and two of them were delivered by Randy Mayeux:

Winning: The Ultimate Business How-To Book (with Suzy Welch, HarperCollins Publishers, 1999)

Jack: Straight from the Gut (Hachette Book Group, 2003)

The Real-Life MBA: Your No-BS Guide to Winning the Game, Building a Team, and Growing Your Career (Suzy Welch, HarperCollins Publishers, 2015)

Welch lived between November 19, 1935 and March 1, 2020.  For the 19 years when I taught Management, Welch was considered top of his game.  You may remember that I was a corporate trainer for many years.  But, how many people that Welch a was teacher in classroom while he was President and CEO?   Many corporate officers did not even know had a training department, let alone teaching in one.

Welch Picture

One of the best books about Welch is Control Your Destiny Or Someone Else Will:  How Jack Welch is Making General Electric the World’s Most Competitive Corporation by Noel Tichy and Stratford Sherman (Doubleday, 1993).

As a professional, Welch was an American business executive, chemical engineer, and writer.  He was chairman and CEO of General Electric (GE) between 1981 and 2001.  When he retired from GE, he received a severance payment of $417 million, the largest such payment in business history.  Welch greatest fan was Noel Tichy, was author of the first book we every presented the First Friday Book Synopsis, (The Leadership Engine with Eli Cohen, HarperBusiness, 2002).  I heard Tichy several times in person.

When he started his run, skeptics wondered how much of a difference the Welch could make in a company that was huge, profitable, and more than 100 years old.  To the surprise of many Welch pushed the company to double-digit growth during his two decades at the helm.   During the 20 years he led the company, its market value grew from $12 billion to $410 billion.

Here are some of the major quotes from his books:

  • “An organization’s ability to learn, and translate that learning into action rapidly, is the ultimate competitive advantage.”
  • “Strong managers who make tough decisions to cut jobs provide the only true job security in today’s world. Weak managers are the problem. Weak managers destroy jobs.”
  • “Good business leaders create a vision, articulate the vision, passionately own the vision, and relentlessly drive it to completion.”
  • “Giving people self-confidence is by far the most important thing that I can do. Because then they will act.”
  • “If you pick the right people and give them the opportunity to spread their wings and put compensation as a carrier behind it you almost don’t have to manage them.”
  • “The essence of competitiveness is liberated when we make people believe that what they think and do is important – and then get out of their way while they do it.”
  • “I’ve learned that mistakes can often be as good a teacher as success.”
  • “Willingness to change is a strength, even if it means plunging part of the company into total confusion for a while.”
  • “Face reality as it is, not as it was or as you wish it to be.”
  • “Be candid with everyone.”

To attract the right followers, Welch instituted a strategy that earned him the title of “Neutron Jack.”  Welch insisted that all of GE’s divisions be market leaders.  ″Fix it, close it or sell it,” he was fond of saying.  He had GE cut all businesses in which the company could not dominate the market in first or second positions.  He had managers fire the bottom 10% of GE employees, and he fired the bottom 10% of management.  Welch’s housecleaning cleared away layers of bureaucracy, and made way for a quicker flow of ideas.  The new commitment to competition came with large rewards, especially as stock option grants increased in value and GE continued to grow rapidly. GE soon became one of the most coveted places to work and attracted the best in the world

Fortune magazine once called him “manager of the century.”  His books are well worth re-reading.  He gave great insight about management and leadership, in a way that no else has ever duplicated.

Two Great Books by Amor Towles

Amor Towles

Amor Towles

The books by Amor Towles are wonderful.  The two in the covers are best-sellers, and are award-winners.  You can read his biography below.

“Born and raised in the Boston area, Amor Towles graduated from Yale College and received an MA in English from Stanford University. Having worked as an investment professional for over twenty years, Mr. Towles now devotes himself full time to writing in Manhattan, where he lives with his wife and two children.

“Mr. Towles’s first novel, Rules of Civility, which was published in Rules of Civility2011, was a New York Times bestseller and was named by the Wall Street Journal as one of the best books of 2011. The book has been translated into over 20 languages, its French translation receiving the 2012 Prix Fitzgerald.

“Mr. Towles’s second novel, A Gentleman in Moscow, which was published in 2016, was on the New York Times bestseller list for over a year in hardcover and was named one of the best books of 2016 by the Chicago Tribune, the Washington Post, the Philadelphia Inquirer, the San Francisco Chronicle, and NPR. The book has been translated into over thirty-five languages including Russian. In the summer of 2017, the novel was optioned by EOne and the British director Tom Harper to be made into a 16 hour miniseries starring Kenneth Branagh.

A Gentleman in MoscowHere are comments about the books:

“An irresistible and astonishingly assured debut about working class-women and world-weary WASPs in 1930s New York…in the crisp, noirish prose of the era, Towles portrays complex relationships in a city that is at once melting pot and elitist enclave – and a thoroughly modern heroine who fearlessly claims her place in it.” O, the Oprah Magazine

“With this snappy period piece, Towles resurrects the cinematic black-and-white Manhattan of the golden age…[his] characters are youthful Americans in tricky times, trying to create authentic lives.”The New York Times Book Review

“This very good first novel about striving and surviving in Depression-era Manhattan deserves attention…The great strength of Rules of Civility is in the sharp, sure-handed evocation of Manhattan in the late ‘30s.”Wall Street Journal

“How delightful that in an era as crude as ours this finely composed new novel by Amor Towles stretches out with old-World elegance. “A Gentleman in Moscow” offers a chance to sink back into a lost attitude of aristocracy — equal parts urbane and humane — just what we might expect from the author of that 2011 bestseller “Rules of Civility.” But if Towles’s story is an escape we crave, it is also, ironically, a story of imprisonment… – Washington Post”

“Beyond the door of the luxurious ­Hotel Metropol lies Theater Square and the rest of Moscow, and beyond its city limits the tumultuous landscape of 20th-century Russia. The year 1922 is a good starting point for a Russian epic, but for the purposes of his sly and winning second ­novel, Amor Towles forgoes descriptions of icy roads and wintry dachas and instead retreats into the warm hotel lobby. The Metropol, with its customs and routines, is a world unto itself…  – New York Times Book Review”

“Spread across four decades, this is in all ways a great novel, a nonstop pleasure brimming with charm, personal wisdom, and philosophic insight…. This is a book in which the cruelties of the age can’t begin to erase the glories of real human connection and the memories it leaves behind. A masterly encapsulation of modern Russian history, this book more than fulfills the promise of Towles’ stylish debut, Rules of Civility (2011). – Kirkus”

My Books: This Month and Last Month

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Here are the newest books that I have read recently:
(Note:  The books marked with a (*) are current best-sellers)
 
Current Books (April, 2020)
The Boy from the Woods by Harlan Coben*
Rules on Civility by Amor Towels
The Man Who Broke Into Auschwitz by Danis Avey
Drunk on Sports by Tim Cowlishaw 
 
Recent Books (March, 2020)
Long Range by C.J. Box*
A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles
Presidents of War by Michael Beschloss
 
Karl J. Krayer, Ph.D,

My Books: This Month and Last Month

Here are the newest books that I have read recently:

(Note:  The books marked with a (*) are current best-sellers)

 

Current Books (March, 2020)

Long Range by C.J. Box*

A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles

Presidents of War by Michael Beschloss

 

Recent Books (February, 2020)

Three Days in Moscow by Bret Baier*

Just Watch Me by Jeff Lindsay*

The First Wave by Alex Kershaw

When You See Me by Lisa Gardner*

Checkpoint Charlie by Iain MacGregor.

 

CCN Domestic Violence Conference is Huge Success

The Creative Communication Network-sponsored Domestic Violence conference on Friday, October 20, was a great success.

Thanks to Springcreek Church for hosting this event, and for the vendors who shared their products and services with the attendees.  The conference benefited Hope’s Door New Beginning Center in Garland.  Here is a group of participants listening to John Sharp about Battering Intervention:

JohnSharpPictureatConference

This is the incredible Wendy Sheriff, Detective for the City of Garland Police Department, who investigates Domestic Violence and Sex Crimes:

WendySheriffPicture.png

Most importantly, I want to thank the six speakers who each shared a perspective about “Are We Winning the War On Domestic Violence?‘  All of the attendees are more up-to-date, and better informed, as a result of spending time at the conference.

CCNDVConferenceSpeakersPictureOct17