Decision Paralysis vs. Preference for Variety

I have reached the point where I just need to quit reading.  It is all so confusing.  (This is not the first time I have reached this point…)

Malcolm Gladwell in Blink and the Heath brothers in Switch tell us that we are better off with fewer choices.  Give us too many choices, and we arrive at decision paralysis.

Here are the key quotes from these two books:

From Blink:

If you are given too many choices, if you are forced to consider much more than your unconscious is comfortable with, you get paralyzed.  Snap judgments can be made in a snap because they are frugal, and if we want to protect our snap judgments, we have to take steps to protect that frugality.

From Switch:

Decision paralysis.  More options, even good ones, can freeze us and make us retreat to the default plan.  This behavior is clearly not rational, but it is human.

And now this from Dan Ariely, author of Predictably Irrational (via Andrew Sullivan):

Capuchin monkeys like change:
The implications of this simple experiment shed some light on consumer behavior, [Dan Ariely, the James B. Duke Professor of psychology and behavioral economics at Duke University] said. Earlier work on variety-seeking has found that people eat 43 percent more M&M candies when there are 10 colors in the bowl instead of just seven. “People choose variety for variety’s sake,” Ariely said. “They often choose things they don’t even like as well just for the variety. We knew about this, so the interesting thing was to figure out how basic it is.”

and:

Ariely is somewhat puzzled that humans can get stuck in a rut and not seek more variety. “Ask yourself: How many new things have you tried lately? Have you tried every cereal in the cereal aisle?” It may be that you’re enjoying a daily bowl of a cereal that you would rate as an 8, when just a few feet away on the shelf there is a cereal you’d rate as a 9, but you’ve never tried it.
Businesses can push variety on customers with assortment packs, Ariely suggests, and vicarious experiences like the Food Network can encourage exploration as well. “How do we get ourselves to explore? Even monkeys do it — so maybe we should also try more variety.”

So – we’re paralyzed by too many choices, and yet we like and want more variety.

I’m confused – again.  It’s the story of my life!

One thought on “Decision Paralysis vs. Preference for Variety

  1. walter Derzko

    If you look at the specturm of choice and variety it likely forms an inverted U curve.

    We crave variety to a point but then it passes some theoretical point of being too complex.

    Walter Derzko
    Smart Economy
    Toronto

    Reply

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